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Insights

The points of no return, a reference manual in Glasgow

In the last decade, science has discovered that we are probably on the verge of surpassing several “climate tipping points”. It is essential to understand what these are in order to know where to focus mitigation strategies and efforts. They will influence the decisions made at the COP26 in Glasgow, where the success or failure of action against the climate crisis is at stake. We must not fail.

Water for animals, water for school

Climate change is affecting wildlife reserves all around the world. In Africa, nature parks, which are a huge biosphere reserve, are experiencing increasingly prolonged droughts. In Kenya, schoolchildren follow the example of Patrick Mwalua, a pioneering conservationist, and are incorporating the saving of water and energy into their schoolwork. This the story of the short film Environmentalists, shortlisted micro-documentary at the We Art Water Film Festival 5.

Floods: much worse if you are poor

The increase in torrential rains expected with climate change increases the risks of flooding almost everywhere in the world. 587 million poor people are the most defenseless and find it much more difficult to recover from a disaster. Among them, 132 million live below the extreme poverty line (USD 1.9 per day). They are the most vulnerable to a disaster caused by rainfall and poor land management.

Going to school with books and… 5 liters of water

The lack of supply in some Tanzanian schools has forced students to bring their own water to class every day. If they don’t bring a full water drum, they must return home. The short Water is not Life, finalist at the We Art Water Film Festival 5, showcases the harsh consequences of water stress for schoolchildren in many East African schools that depend on rainwater to ensure hygiene and nutrition for their students and teachers.

dust ppal

Desert dust feeds the rain forest

182 billion tons of Saharan dust cross the Atlantic every year, driven by trade winds. This dust settles on the American rain forest providing nutrients that have been essential in its formation and maintenance. Airborne dust has a decisive impact on the evolution of the Earth’s vegetation cover and is an increasingly important factor in the study of climate change.  

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